Tag Archives: China

Redefining US-China relationship

Published by:

According to The Epoch Times, as President Donald Trump appoints increasingly hawkish foreign policy hands to assert U.S. trade interests, a veteran China expert whose views closely mirror that of new national security adviser John Bolton suggests that exposing human rights abuses is the best tool for redefining relations with an aggressive China.

Dan Blumenthal is the director of Asian studies at the American Enterprise Institute and previously advised the U.S. government on China issues for over a decade. He said that while the United States is locked in a strategic competition with China around the world, an effective pushback cannot be a purely military endeavor, but must include an organized effort to expose abuses by the Chinese communist regime.

“The No. 1 weapon we should never give up is human rights,” said Blumenthal, who delivered a keynote speech at the SAIS Asia Conference on March 30. “[Human rights] is a powerful tool for the United States to stay in the center in China and to stand with those who are oppressed.”

Blumenthal pointed to the Chinese regime’s persecution of Uyghurs, the Muslim ethnic group in China’s Xinjiang region, as a topic that should be targeted by U.S. human rights efforts. Doing so could help decouple China’s strategic relations with Muslim majority countries such as Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Gulf states, all of which are at the frontier of China’s global expansion of power.

“China’s policies in Xinjiang are some of the most oppressive toward the Muslims in the world, yet few people know about them,” Blumenthal said, arguing that the U.S. State Department needs to “step up to the competition” and set up an information office similar to the ones established in the Cold War to highlight bad behavior by China.

Blumenthal’s comments follow Trump’s announcement on March 22 that Bolton, a former U.S. ambassador to the U.N., will replace H.R. McMaster as national security adviser, starting April 9.

US might retreat from its tough policies towards China

Published by:

According to Asia Times, US President Donald Trump’s recent switch from engaging to confronting China has put the world on edge. China’s quick response in vowing a “tit-for-tat” on US tariffs imposed on its goods prompted a free fall in the US stock market, with a combined loss totaling nearly 6 percent in the week ending March 23, the worst in more than two years, though it has rebounded since.

This market volatility coupled with outcries from US businesses against Trump’s “tough” policy stances seem to have an impact on the US president or his senior officials. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin called his Chinese counterpart, Vice-Premier Liu He, on Saturday to discuss the issue. In that telephone call, Liu was reported to have told Mnuchin that China would retaliate against the US if Trump followed through with his tariff proposal, where to buy liquor.

The fact that Mnuchin is opening the door for negotiations to address issues with China’s “economic czar” is a good sign of a pragmatic approach to addressing differences between the world’s two largest economies. That will avert a trade war, at least for now.

What’s more, Mnuchin’s gesture seems to indicate the recognition that the kind of trade threats leveled against Japan, the UK, France, and Germany in the 1980s will not work against 21st-century China.

The United States’ huge trade deficit with Japan in the 1980s led to the signing of the Plaza Accord in 1985 among the so-called Group of Five: the US, the UK, Japan, Germany, and France. The main purpose of the accord was to weaken the US dollar against the other four countries’ currencies.

Between 1980 and 1985, the greenback appreciated as much as 50 percent against the yen, pound, franc, and mark, prompting US companies such as General Motors, Caterpillar, Motorola, and others to ask for protection against foreign imports (notably from Japan). What’s more, the US had incurred a merchandise trade deficit of almost 3.5 percent of gross domestic product with the four powers and had just emerged from a recession.

China, no to trade war! says East West Bank CEO

Published by:

According to Xinhuanet’s report, Chairman and CEO of East West Bank Dominic Ng said, “It looks like President Donald Trump has started to do something in order to live up to another aggressive campaign promising to address trade imbalances after the tax reform has been done last year.”

Ng emphasized the fact that domestic political purpose was behind the decision of higher aluminum and steel import tariffs imposed by Washington on March 8. However, the trade deficit issue may be overstated by the politicians and may lead to the trade war with other countries like China.

“It is a strange phenomenon that the steel and aluminum tariff issue actually has the very small impact on Chinese exporters since only a measly two percent of total U.S. imports of steel products, by value, came from China in 2017. But most people interviewed by local media in street showed they believed China will feel pain,” he said during a recent interview with Xinhua at the bank’s headquarters in Pasadena City of California.

Statistics revealed Canada as the biggest supplier of steel to the United States. South Korea accounts for over 10 percent of all the US steel imports in 2017 while Japan accounts for almost six percent. Moreover, the Europeans are worried steel might have gone to the US and may now find its way to EU. This would pressure local steelmakers even further, find liquor store.

Ng cites in an interview how public opinion in the United States is turning against the free trade. However, they the public does not desire for a trade war, not speaking of a ‘ridiculous’ trade war base on wrong calculations.

“A trade war must have an internecine result,” the banker said.  East West Bank has 36 billion U.S. dollars of assets and was listed by the Forbes in January as one of the top five on the annual list of America’s Best Banks 2018.

China’s first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier

Published by:

Reporting from Melbourne Australia, Defense News revealed that one of China’s biggest shipbuilders unveiled plans to speed up the development of the said country’s aircraft carrier. This will be a part of China’s goal to upgrade their navy into a blue water force by the mid of next ten years.

According to China Shipbuilding Industry Association, also known as CSIC, they will try to twice the effort on achieving technological breakthroughs for the following area:

  • Nuclear-powered aircraft carriers
  • New nuclear-powered submarines
  • Quieter conventionally powered submarines
  • Underwater artificial intelligence-based combat systems
  • Integrated networked communications systems

Moreover, CSIC is also in charge for both civilian and military shipbuilding activities in the north and the west of China. The company adds that these breakthroughs are essential to PLAN, or China’s People Liberation Army Navy. It is for the enhancement of their capability to operate worldwide in line with the service’s mission to be networked and bluewater navy by 2025.

Note that the updated news release says the company “must resolutely implement (Chinese President) Xi Jinping’s thinking on strengthening our armed forces and take the building of a modern warfare system with Chinese characteristics as a guide to speed up breakthroughs in key core technologies.”

In addition, CSIC is responsible for the refurbishment of China’s sole operational aircraft carrier. They are in charge as well in building China’s first indigenously built aircraft carrier. It is a slightly modified version of Liaoning, which featured several improvements. As if these are not enough, China also plans a larger and more powered aircraft carrier that will be filled with electromagnetic catapults to launch aircraft.papa survey is where you can voice out.

Furthermore, PLAN already operates a pair of catapults. Their current aircraft carriers can launch aircraft via ski-jumps, restricting the ability to operate aircraft like turboprop-powered airborne early warning aircraft.

New Tourism in China

Published by:

Over 700,000 visitors went to a light-show theme park in Haining and Mickey Mouse’ gang in Shanghai would sure be worried about the new blood of the showtime rivals. Haining is reportedly a city near Shanghai and it has China’s biggest leather mall. The visitors were amazed at the ten-minute water and light show of dolphins, tortoises, and virtual models wearing the newest leather and fur fashions.

One cannot deny that China has embraced the technologies more than any country in Asia. This includes ‘augmented reality’ and holograms and it did draw the people who love new thrills. According to The Strait Times, US$2.7 billion (S$3.6 billion) of venture capital has poured into the nation’s travel sector in the two years through 2016.

“In the past, people looked for only basic, low-end package tours – now they want better adventures. China’s policymakers are quite supportive as such experiential tours help boost consumption and the economy,” said Mr. Zhou Kai, a Beijing-based senior director at research firm Zero2IPO. Haining is expected to compete against Singapore’s finest: Sydney’s Opera House and Singapore’s Marina Bay. Aside from this is at least a dozen other cities in China. The biggest Internet veterans also wade in, in partnership with the local government.

One thing that Haining dominates is the leather goods in e-commerce. The Park opened last September and already attracted over 3.9 million visitors. They are paying 80yuan or $17 each ticket. “The idea is simple; tourists come here to shop for leather during the day and stay to watch the shows at night. It is not just the tickets – all of a sudden, your restaurants and hotels are also booming,” said Mr. Zhou Wei, founder of Nth Power.

“Do not underestimate the demand for these VR hologram theme parks and shows for the cities in China. Places like Hangzhou and Hainan – that are already tourist destinations – all want this,” Mr. Zhou added. Is this article helpful? Try checking in the Kroger customers’ feedback for more details.

China warship gets additional ‘feature’

Published by:

China is believed to have acquired a key technology enabling the development of the electromagnetic weapon after the Global Financial Crisis in 2008 when it bought out the British firm Dynex Semiconductor.

China’s apparently odd choice of an amphibious landing ship to mount such a weapon is probably because of its large cargo capacity. Photos of the ship berthed at a facility at Wuchang Shipyard in Hubei province seems to unveil three large shipping containers braced on its open deck.

These entertained the electrical generators needed to supply the railgun’s intense magnetic field. A new control room added was added to the ship as well as a set of new sensors, above the superstructure. The gun was described to be huge. Roughly the same size as a 32-megajoule railgun the US has been testing. The US-BAE rail gun is intended to fire a 10kg projectile at Mach 7 (8500km/h) over 150km.

Combining this with new integrated electric propulsion systems in warships enables the use of electromagnetic catapults to launch fighters from carriers without the need for powerful nuclear power plants. It also makes fitting electromagnetic rail guns viable.

Moreover, military technology expert Wang Ping at the Institute of Electrical Engineering under the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing told Chinese outlet the new system meant electricity-hungry launch systems and weapons is currently available to be used by any powered vessel. A lot of fund in the bank was surely used.

USS Iowa firing her 16in main guns during 1984 fleet exercises. In World War 2, big guns fell out of favor because of the vastly superior flexibility and range of aircraft delivered bombs and torpedoes, along with the rise of guided missiles.

On the other hand, the US Navy announced it had found software late last month to fix the problem of the USS Ford. But it is not expected to be available for high-intensity combat until 2019, News.com.au revealed.